The Future of Cybercrime and Terrorism

From hacking hospitals to seizing control of the electrical grid, hackers are exploring technology for vulnerabilities. And the danger comes from far worse than stolen data or infrastructure disruption: biotech discoveries could easily be turned into weapons of mass destruction, while 3D printers could help criminals get their hands on easily printed guns.

Cybercrime and cyberterror are already affecting our lives, and their effects are broader than you might imagine. From hacking hospitals to seizing control of the electrical grid to cause power outages, hackers are exploring the IoT for vulnerabilities. And the danger comes from far worse than stolen data or infrastructure disruption: biotech discoveries could easily be turned into weapons of mass destruction while 3D printers could help criminals get their hands of easily printed guns. Although the future is uncertain, the threat it brings is real.

Keynote Speaker, Trendwatcher and Futurist

Richard van Hooijdonk